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Barry Keoghan Poses Nude for ‘Vanity Fair’ Hollywood Issue – Hollywood Life

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Barry Keoghan
Image Credit: MICHAEL TRAN/AFP via Getty Images

Barry Keoghan is fearless, no doubt. The Irish actor, 31, posed completely nude for the new Vanity Fair Hollywood issue. A new video features Barry channeling his Saltburn character, Oliver Quick, while undressed. 

The totally bare moment shows up at the end of a new Instagram video shared by the publication on Wednesday, February 21. While cheekily smiling for the camera, Barry covered his midsection with only his hands but showed off his entire backside. 

Barry’s final scene in Saltburn includes the actor dancing to Sophie Ellis-Bextor’s “Murder on the Dancefloor” while naked. Most camera shots didn’t hold back in showing Barry full frontal. 

The Masters of the Air actor clearly doesn’t mind going nude from time to time. During his interview with Vanity Fair, Barry admitted that he dances around his own home without any clothes on. 

Barry Keoghan
Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

“I didn’t really draw parallels to him the way I have to certain other characters,” Barry said about his character, Oliver. He added, “I do dance around naked though, in my house. Everyone does, man. We all sing in the shower. We all act silly when we’re alone, and we feel this freedom. It’s one thing that I did relate to. Not dancing around a manor of that sort with that fecking drip hanging about — but I sing out loud, I dance silly and move my body silly.”

While reflecting on having to rock out to “Murder on the Dancefloor,” Barry noted, “I remember that song coming out years ago when I was a kid, and it being a massive hit as it was. Never did I think I’d be fecking dancing around with no clothes on, moving to the beats of it.”

The Banshees of Inisherin star, however, pointed out that the public’s objectification and sexualization of an actor going nude on camera “can be detrimental to the mind and your mental state if you read into it too much or you look at too much stuff being said.”  

“I wouldn’t go there if I wasn’t prepared for that, or if I wasn’t open to receiving what people want to say,” Barry said. “I think it shows an act of maturity in your craft, and if it justifies the story and moves it forward, why not? You look at European cinema and they tend to have a lot of scenes that involve nudity, and it’s not a massive thing, really.”  

When it comes to on-camera nudity, Barry believes that “it’s true art” because “it’s true vulnerability as well” when a person strips for a film. 

“You’re really kind of putting yourself out there in the most vulnerable state,” he concluded. “It’s beautiful to look at. I’m not saying it’s because of my body, but it’s freeing to see that body move around in the way it does. It’s like a moving painting, almost.”



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